Subject

Religious Education

Brief Introduction

“The principle aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.” Stoke on Trent Agreed Syllabus for RE 2016-21

The threefold aim of RE elaborates the principle aim:

  1. Know about and understand a range of religions and worldviews
  2. Express ideas and insights about the nature, significance and impact of religions and worldviews

Gain and deploy the skills needed to engage seriously with religions and worldviews.

Areas of Study

Autumn Term Spring Term Summer Term
Year 7

 

 

·         What difference does it make to believe in..? Buddhist, Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Sikh

 

·         What is so radical about Jesus?

 

 

·         Should religious buildings be sold to feed the starving? Christian, Muslims, and/or Sikhs

 

 

·         What is good and what is challenging about being a teenage Sikh or Buddhist or Muslim in Britain today?

 

Year 8

 

 

·         What difference does it make to believe in..? Buddhist, Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Sikh

 

·         Does living biblically mean obeying the whole Bible?

 

 

·         Is death the end? Does it matter? Christian, Buddhist and/or non-religious worldviews e.g. Humanist

 

How can people express the spiritual through the arts? Buddhist, Christ

·         Does religion help people to be good? Buddhist, Christian, Muslim, Sikh, non-religious worldviews e.g. Humanism

 

Year 9

 

 

·         What difference does it make to believe in..? Buddhist, Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Sikh

 

·         Do we need to prove God’s existence? Christian, Buddhist and/or Muslim, non-religious worldviews

 

·         Why is there suffering? Are there any good solutions? Christian and Buddhist

 

·         Should happiness be the purpose of life? Christian, Buddhist and non-religious e.g. Humanist

 

·         Is religion a power for peace or a cause of conflict in the world today? Christian, Muslim, non-religious e.g. Humanism

 

Year 10

(2016)

 

 

·         Theme B: Religion and Life

 

 

 

Christian/Muslim views

 

·         Theme D: Religion, peace and conflict

 

 

Christian/Muslim views

 

·         Theme F: Religion, human rights and social Justice

 

Christian/Muslim views

Year 11

(2017)

 

 

·         Theme E: Religion, crime and punishment

 

Christian/Muslim views

 

In depth study of religions:

·         Christianity

Islam

 

REVISION / EXAMS

 

KS4 Core Religious Education

  • What’s going on in the world today?

 

Discuss the moral/social issues raised; structured personal response using thinking skills.

  • The Big Questions

 

Listen to the debate. Pay particular attention to the range of opinions and evidence used to justify point of view. Now it’s your turn… what would you say? What evidence would you use? Structure personal response using thinking skills.

  • Thunks!

 

Encourage students to table debate/unpick a thunk. Aim is to allow students to think about how they think.

  • Thinking Games

 

Power Point presentation of thinking games to play with the students. Aim is to allow students to think about how they think.

Answer or discuss the questions behind each game. Extend task: students create their own game to encourage thinking ??

  • Stimulus material – pictures/ music (p4c influence)

 

Students are to study the song/lyrics/visual artwork and decide upon a train of thought; as a class, students follow the train of thought throughout the lesson. Structure personal response / reflection using Thinking Skills.

Assessment

Lower school – periodic review of Attitude to Learning and EXT engagement.

GCSE – Component 1: The study of religions: Beliefs, teachings and practices

  • Christianity – Key beliefs, Jesus Christ and salvation, Worship and festivals, The role of the Church in the local and worldwide community
  • Islam – Key beliefs, authority, worship, duties and festivals.

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

96 marks (plus 5 marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPAG))

50% of GCSE

Each religion has a common structure of two five-part questions of 1, 2, 4, 5, and 12 marks.

Each religion is marked out of 48.

Component 2: Thematic studies

Religious, philosophical and ethical studies themes:

  • Theme B: Religion and life
  • Theme D: Religion, peace and conflict
  • Theme E: Religion, crime and punishment
  • Religion, human rights and social justice

Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

96 marks (plus 5 marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPAG))

50% of GCSE

Each theme has a common structure of one five-part question of 1, 2, 4, 5, and 12 marks.

Each theme is marked out of 24.

Firefly/Extended Learning

The Religious Education firefly page contains useful links for current GCSE students as a bank of GCSE past papers and mark schemes and revision tools.

As soon as such material is available for the new GCSE scheme of work the webpage will be update to accommodate the changes in specification.

Extended Learning is regularly set and will either follow on from the lesson or will be preparation for the coming lesson.

Links to useful Resources/ Exam Specifications/ Apps

AQA website – past papers and mark schemes

Firefly

GCSE Bitesize

Extra –curricular activities

Informal support sessions as and when required.